Archives For GMAT prep

gmat-self-studyYou’ve been thinking for a while now about going back to business school. You’ll go sometime in the future…but you haven’t started to do much about it yet.

Well, break out your pencils* and get ready to take advantage of your new membership in the GMAT Exercise Club! We’re going to set up a custom program for you to get the score you need by summer’s end—and then you can decide whether to apply this fall or to wait a year or two.

*Okay, okay, you don’t use pencils for this test anymore, nor is there an actual GMAT Exercise Club, and I can’t really give each and every one of you a completely customized, individual study program. But I can tell you what to start doing today to get yourself ready to take the GMAT by the end of the summer, as long as you make the commitment to get your brain in gear, do a little bit every day, and conquer Mount Everest…er, the GMAT.

This article will assume that you plan to study on your own. If you are still deciding whether to study on your own, take a class, or work with a tutor, the following article discusses the pros and cons of each approach: How to Choose an Approach: Self-study, Class, or Tutor.

Here’s how to develop a study plan that’s appropriate for you.

Week 1: Take a CAT

Your first step is to take a practice CAT under official testing conditions (including all 4 sections: essay, IR, quant, verbal).

It’s best to use a test-prep company CAT for this, not GMATPrep (the official practice test from the makers of the GMAT), as the purpose for taking this practice CAT is to gain insight into your strengths and weaknesses. While GMATPrep is the closest thing to the real test, it provides no data with which to evaluate your performance. Save GMATPrep for later in your study.

Right now, you might be protesting: but I haven’t studied anything yet! That’s okay. In fact, that’s the point! You need to determine what you do already know or understand and what you don’t so that you can set up an effective study plan for yourself. Don’t stress about your first score—use it as a study tool.

It is smart, though, to make sure that you learn a little bit about one particular question type before you take that test. Unless you’ve studied for the GMAT before, you probably haven’t seen anything like Data Sufficiency, so review that question type before your first CAT.

If you take an MGMAT CAT, use this two-part article to analyze your results: Evaluating Your Practice Tests. (The link given here is to the first part of the article; you can find the link to the second part at the end of the first part.)

Week 1: Choose Your Materials or Program

Next, you need a study plan. To start, figure out what materials you’ll use to study. At the least, you will need two things:

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Here are the free GMAT events we’re holding this week. All times are local unless otherwise specified.

5/20/13- Glendale, CA  - Free Trial Class - 6:30PM- 9:30PM

5/21/13- Online - Free Trial Class - 8:00PM- 11:00PM (EDT)

5/21/13- Online - Assessing Your MBA Profile presented by mbaMission- 9:00PM-10:30PM (EDT)

5/21/13- San Francisco, CA - Free Trial Class-  6:30PM-9:30PM

5/22/13- Santa Monica- Free Trial Class-  6:30PM- 9:30PM

5/22/13- New York, NY -MBA Missions Myths Destroyed presented by mbaMission- 7:30PM- 9:00PM

5/22/13- London- Free Trial Class - 6:30PM- 9:30PM

Looking for more free events? Check out our Free Events Listings Page.

Here are the free GMAT events we’re holding this week. All times are local unless otherwise specified.

4/15/13- Silicon Valley, CA - Free Trial Class - 6:30PM- 9:30PM

4/15/13- Bellevue, WA - Free Trial Class - 6:30PM- 9:30PM

4/15/13- Austin, TX - Free Trial Class- 6:30PM-9:30PM

4/16/13- Irvine, CA - Free Trial Class-  6:30PM-9:30PM

4/16/13- Online- Free Trial Class- 9:00PM- 12:00AM (EDT)

4/16/13- Toronto, ON - Free Trial Class - 6:30PM- 9:30PM

4/17/13- Boston, MA - Free Trial Class - 6:30PM- 9:30PM

4/17/13- Glendale, CZ - Free Trial Class- 6:30PM- 9:30PM

4/17/13- Washington, DC - Free Trial Class- 6:30PM- 9:30PM

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All About the GMAT

Stacey Koprince —  June 10, 2009 — 2 Comments

Application season is starting to heat up again! For those of you just getting started, here’s an overview of “what’s what” with the GMAT.

What Is The GMAT?

The Graduate Management Admissions Test is a standardized test that many English-speaking business schools require applicants to take. The test is called a CAT, or Computer Adaptive Test, both because it is administered on a computer and because the test actually changes based upon how we answer the questions. The computer chooses what test questions to give us based upon our performance up until that point in the test. In a sense, we all take a different test, because the specific mix of questions any one person sees is based on that person’s performance during the test.

To register for the test or learn more information straight from the testwriters, go to www.mba.com.

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Businessweek is following up on the recent enforcement action by GMAC against a website, Scoretop, that illicitly gave students access to ‘real’ GMAT questions. It’s very interesting reading.

Perhaps the most fascinating effect is that students who used the now-defunct site may be barred from applying to Business School, or even expelled if they’re already in a program! GMAC is now reportedly going through Scoretop’s hard drives to find the identities of past users of the site, with serious repercussions for confirmed users.

The lesson is that you may want to be careful what resources you use to prepare for the GMAT, as the consequences could be FAR worse than a subpar score. Certainly run the other way if anyone purports to have ‘real’ questions, as the only publicly available questions are available from GMAC itself (the Official Guides, GMAT Prep, GMAT Focus, old paper tests). Note that ManhattanGMAT recommends all of GMAC’s resources as the best and only way to get access to GMAT questions straight from the source. As we’re fond of saying around here at MGMAT, there really are no shortcuts to getting a high score!

Here’s the latest in our Content Series, by Chris Ryan, Director of Instructor and Product Development, ManhattanGMAT:

GMAT Strategies for the Verbally-Concerned

Last time we talked about strategies for the math-challenged. But what if you have the opposite issue?

Maybe you can solve equations just fine; it’s this fuzzy language stuff that gets you down. Maybe your teachers never gave you a good solid foundation in grammar.

Maybe English isn’t your first language, in which case I sincerely admire you.

Or maybe you’re not so bad at English, but you want to do great on the verbal because you’re actually really worried about the math “ and you want to get all the points you can.

Whatever the cause is, you are concerned about the verbal side of the exam.

Fear not! Here are five strategies to guide you.

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