Archives For business schools

Original Schedule/Timeline photo by Peter Kaminski on FlickrThe folks at mbaMission always recommend getting started with your MBA applications as early as possible. By taking action now, you can dramatically improve your chances of gaining admission to a top MBA program in the coming years. It is never too soon (and certainly not too late) to take several crucial steps to shape your MBA candidacy. So they’re presenting a five-part series to provide a step-by-step timeline to help guide you down the long road of applying to business school. These guidelines assume that you are setting out a year ahead of the January deadlines. Even if you are starting later, you should be able to leverage this timeline to help you prioritize each step along the way. This week, they lay out what you should be doing May through July. For more information on mbaMission and how they can help you in this process, click here.

View Part 2 here.

May

Brainstorm and Start Writing Essays
We at mbaMission always tell our clients, You can’t turn a bad idea into a good essay. We insist on taking our candidates through a lengthy brainstorming process (which begins with a thorough questionnaire) to discover the stories that make each candidate distinct. Even as you uncover your stories, it is still important to consider them from as many different angles as possible. While this will help ensure that you understand the various weapons in your arsenal, Continue Reading…

People often associate business school degrees with a handful of traditional fields, such as consulting. But according to this piece at Page Six Magazine, the growing fashionista crowd at Harvard Business School is demonstrating you don’t have to be Michael Bloomberg to go for an MBA.

Take Olga Vidisheva, a 25-year-old model and current MBA candidate. She attended Wellesley, did two years at Goldman Sachs, and then decided finance wasn’t for her. She applied to HBS, specifically aiming to change careers to fashion. Her plan seems to be paying off, as evidenced by her summer spent interning with Chanel’s marketing department. And she’s not alone. We’ve already covered HBS alums Alexandra Wilkis Wilson and Alexis Maybank, who founded Gilt Groupe. Other startups have followed, including FashionStake, a site that allows you to invest in newbie designers; Birchbox, which sends monthly beauty samples to members; and Rent the Runway, which rents designer dresses.

Ultimately, only 3 percent of Harvard grads go on to retail careers, as opposed to 57 percent working in finance or consulting. But sartorially-inclined students report the program is becoming the place for fashion”and they ought to know what’s in vogue!

Valeyoshino, "Hard Work," 1/31/2008 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution, http://www.flickr.com/photos/valeyoshino/2232687811/

You’ve probably spent lots of time weighing the merits of various business schools”professors, location, course offerings. But this month’s Bloomberg Business Week offers some food for thought about the individuals who lead the whole operation: deans.

The article profiles two programs that have recently hired former corporate executives as deans. Boston University has recruited Kenneth Freeman, formerly of Quest Diagnostics, while Viacom’s Neil Braun will start in the fall at Pace. And they aren’t the first, either. Corporate deans are still rare, but you’ll find them at both Wake Forest and Ohio State University.  Why the non-traditional choices? They can bring a new perspective, as search committee chair N. Venkat Venkatraman explains: “We wanted someone who could think outside the box, and the committee felt that Ken Freeman brought something new and exciting to the school. There’s also the appeal of a candidate with extensive management experience. The search committee told Freeman they wanted a builder, someone who could advance the school’s strategic plan”and that’s what they saw in the former CEO.

Don’t expect a sea change in the hiring of b-school deans, but this is certainly an interesting development in MBA education.

All About the GMAT

Stacey Koprince —  June 10, 2009 — 2 Comments

Application season is starting to heat up again! For those of you just getting started, here’s an overview of “what’s what” with the GMAT.

What Is The GMAT?

The Graduate Management Admissions Test is a standardized test that many English-speaking business schools require applicants to take. The test is called a CAT, or Computer Adaptive Test, both because it is administered on a computer and because the test actually changes based upon how we answer the questions. The computer chooses what test questions to give us based upon our performance up until that point in the test. In a sense, we all take a different test, because the specific mix of questions any one person sees is based on that person’s performance during the test.

To register for the test or learn more information straight from the testwriters, go to www.mba.com.

Continue Reading…

US News and World Report recently released its latest b-school rankings, and the folks over at admissions consulting firm MBA Mission gave their take on the news here.

(To echo something in the MBA Mission post, it is far more important to make sure a school is right for you than it is to make sure that the school has a high ranking. Please don’t get all caught up in artificial rankings and then find yourself at the wrong school for you.)

If you want to go straight for the US News report, follow this link.

Bschools react to Scoretop

ayang —  August 1, 2008

Again from Businessweek we have Business Schools themselves reacting to the Scoretop affair. A wait-and-see attitude seems to be the dominant theme until more facts and numbers are presented. Certainly the number of affected individuals seems to be substantially smaller than the 6,000 identified students to date.