Archives For 2012

In honor of Gabby Douglas’ gold medal win, as well as the U.S. women’s gymnastics team’s all-around gold medal win, here is an Olympics-inspired Data Sufficiency problem.

gmat olympics

A particular gymnastics tournament awards a gold, a silver, and a bronze medal in each of four events: Floor, Beam, Bars, and Vault. A platinum Best All-Around medal is awarded to the competitor who gains the most points from winning the other medals: 3 points for gold, 2 points for silver, 1 point for bronze. If McKenzie won the Best All-Around medal, and no one can win more than one medal in any of the four events, did she win at least one gold medal?

  1. All of the gold, silver, and bronze medals were won by fewer than six competitors, including McKenzie
  2. Another competitor in the tournament has 8 points.

(A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.

(B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.

(C) BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.

(D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.

(E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

Choose your answer before proceeding!

First, you may ask, How could someone win the All-Around without winning a single gold medal?

Easy “ just imagine that McKenzie won ALL of the silver medals (8 points), and that no one else won more than one medal (the other medals are won by 8 separate people), so each person who has a gold has just 3 points, and each person who has a bronze has just 1 point.

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Our very own Manhattan GMAT instructor Tom Rose has another life outside of teaching the GMAT. He and Miro Kaz host a online show called the MBA Show. This week, they were lucky enough to interview Dave Wilson, the President and CEO of the GMAC (the company that makes the GMAT). Not only is this segment full of good information, it’s also entertaining, so enjoy!

For more episodes of the MBA Show, check out their website.